(Source: dailydoseofstuf, via elizabeth-james)

(Source: indypendent-thinking, via agentlewoman)

(Source: mercurieux)

(Source: iraffiruse, via whitebridges)

So raise a glass to teenage girls for their linguistic innovation. It expands our expressive vocabulary, giving us new words and modes of expression. Speakers may nostalgically look to a previous golden era of English, but the truth is that Shakespeare’s English is an abomination of Chaucer’s English, which is an abomination of Beowolf’s. Language is inherently unstable. It’s in a constant state of flux, made and remade—stretched, altered, broken down and rearranged—by its speakers every day. Rather than a sign of corruption and disorder, this is language in its full vitality—a living, evolving organism.
Gabriel Arana, “Creaky Voice: Yet Another Example of Young Women’s Linguistic Ingenuity” (via floreses)

(via teacoffeebooks)

modern-vampires-of-art-history:

Gustave Moreau, Cleopatra (1887) / Vampire Weekend, Step (2013)

modern-vampires-of-art-history:

Gustave Moreau, Cleopatra (1887) / Vampire Weekend, Step (2013)

(via coffeekaling)

(Source: flyingorcas, via theepitomeofquiet)

(via mercurieux)

hermioneandthegrangers:

The Strokes - Call Me Back

I look for you

And you look away

(via whatevelyn)


bouffantsandbrokenhearts - Skeleton and Flowers.

bouffantsandbrokenhearts - Skeleton and Flowers.

(via planetelex)

What matters in life is not what happens to you but what you remember and how you remember it.
Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez (via psychotherapy)

(via telegraphs)

(Source: among-conifers, via libbetscasey)

Psycho (USA, 1960)

(Source: in-love-with-movies, via formerginenthusiast)

It’s enough for me to be sure that you and I exist at this moment.
Gabriel García Márquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude (via merulae)

(via everythinglovely)

vein:

continuos line drawing of a boy

vein:

continuos line drawing of a boy

(Source: vein, via lilacwine)